premise

premise
\ \ [14] Premise comes via Old French premisse from medieval Latin praemissa, a noun use of the past participle of Latin praemitteresend ahead’. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix prae- ‘before’ and mitteresend’ (source of English admit, commit, mission, transmit, etc). It first entered English as a technical term in logic, in which its underlying meaning is of a proposition ‘set before’ someone. But it was also used in the plural as a legal term, meaning ‘matters stated previously’.
\ \ In a conveyance or will, such ‘matters’ were often houses or other buildings referred to specifically at the beginning of the document, and so the term premises came to denote such buildings.
\ \ Cf.ADMIT, COMMIT, MISSION, PERMIT, SUBMIT, TRANSMIT

Word origins - 2ed. . 2005.

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  • Premise — Pre*mise , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Premised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Premising}.] [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See {Premise}, n.] 1. To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Premise — Pre*mise , v. i. To make a premise; to set forth something as a premise. Swift. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • premise — index assume (suppose), assumption (supposition), basis, foundation (basis), generalization, ground …   Law dictionary

  • premise — premise, premiss A premiss (usually pronounced prem is) or (rarely) premise is a previous statement from which another is inferred; the plural is premisses or premises. In the plural, premises also means ‘a house or building with its grounds’. As …   Modern English usage

  • premise — [prem′is; ] for v., chiefly Brit [ pri mīz′] n. [ME premisse < ML praemissa < L praemissus, pp. of praemittere, to send before < prae , before + mittere, to send: see PRE & MISSION] 1. a) a previous statement or assertion that serves as… …   English World dictionary

  • premise# — premise n postulate, posit, presupposition, presumption, assumption (see under PRESUPPOSE) Analogous words: ground, *reason: proposition, *proposal premise vb postulate, posit, *presuppose, presume, assume …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • premise — [n] hypothesis, argument apriorism, assertion, assumption, basis, evidence, ground, posit, postulate, postulation, presumption, presupposition, proof, proposition, supposition, thesis; concepts 529,689 Ant. fact, reality, truth premise [v]… …   New thesaurus

  • premise — ► NOUN (Brit. also premiss) 1) Logic a previous statement from which another is inferred. 2) an underlying assumption. ► VERB (premise on/upon) ▪ base (an argument, theory, etc.) on. ORIGIN Old French premisse, from Latin. praemissa propositio… …   English terms dictionary

  • Premise — Prem ise, n.; pl. {Premises}. [Written also, less properly, {premiss}.] [F. pr[ e]misse, fr. L. praemissus, p. p. of praemittere to send before; prae before + mittere to send. See {Mission}.] 1. A proposition antecedently supposed or proved;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • prémise — ● prémise nom féminin (de pré mise en train) Ensemble d opérations de contrôle et de mise au point sur la forme typographique avant son calage …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • premise — (n.) late 14c., in logic, a previous proposition from which another follows, from O.Fr. premisse, from M.L. premissa (propositio) (the proposition) set before, fem. pp. of L. praemittere send or put before, from prae before (see PRE (Cf. pre )) + …   Etymology dictionary

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