moot

moot
\ \ [OE] Etymologically, a ‘moot point’ is one talked about at a ‘meeting’. For ‘meeting’ is the original sense of the noun moot – particularly as applied in early medieval England to a meeting functioning as a court of law. The word goes back to a prehistoric Germanic *mōtammeeting’, source also of English meet. Its modern adjectival usage seems to have emerged in the 16th century. The derived verb moot goes back to Old English times (mōtianconverse, plead in court’), but again its present-day use, for ‘suggest, propose’, is a more recent development, dating from the 17th century.
\ \ Cf.MEET

Word origins - 2ed. . 2005.

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  • moot — 1 / müt/ vt: to make moot statute of limitations would moot the effort S. R. Sontag moot 2 adj [(of a trial or hearing) hypothetical, staged for practice, from moot hypothetical case for law students, argument, deliberative assembly, from Old… …   Law dictionary

  • Moot — Moot, n. [AS. m[=o]t, gem[=o]t, a meeting; usually in comp.] [Written also {mote}.] 1. A meeting for discussion and deliberation; esp., a meeting of the people of a village or district, in Anglo Saxon times, for the discussion and settlement of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Moot — may refer to: from Moot as an Old English language (Anglo Saxon) term for meeting: Folkmoot Jamtamót, the old assembly of Jämtland Witenagemot, the High Council of Anglo Saxon England Moot hall or Moot hill, a meeting or assembly place,… …   Wikipedia

  • Moot — Gründer und Administrator des Imageboards 4chan. Laut Time World s Most Influential Person 2008 [1] World Scout Moot …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • moot´er — moot «moot», adjective, verb, noun. –adj. that is doubtful or debatable; that can be argued: »a moot point. ╂[< noun] –v.t. 1. to bring forward (a point, subject, question, or case) for discussion: »The project of this conference was first… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Moot — Moot, a. 1. Subject, or open, to argument or discussion; undecided; debatable; mooted. [1913 Webster] 2. Of purely theoretical or academic interest; having no practical consequence; as, the team won in spite of the bad call, and whether the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • moot — A moot point or moot question is a debatable or undecided one. The word is from Old English (from a verb mōtian meaning ‘converse’) and should not be confused with mute meaning ‘silent’ …   Modern English usage

  • moot — (m[=o]t), v. See 1st {Mot}. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • moot — (m[=oo]t), n. (Shipbuilding) A ring for gauging wooden pins. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Moot — Moot, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Mooted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Mooting}.] [OE. moten, motien, AS. m[=o]tan to meet or assemble for conversation, to discuss, dispute, fr. m[=o]t, gem[=o]t, a meeting, an assembly; akin to Icel. m[=o]t, MHG. muoz. Cf. {Meet}… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Moot — Moot, v. i. To argue or plead in a supposed case. [1913 Webster] There is a difference between mooting and pleading; between fencing and fighting. B. Jonson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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